Sometimes the best show on Earth is in the theater of life. All the world's a stage, especially Machane Yehuda market, when you have time to watch and listen.

As I'm waiting in line for my turn to weigh the avocados and tomatoes I have in my hands I heard the best piece of wisdom concerning the elections coming up.

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"You see", the elderly man in front of me is telling the stall owner, "Back in the summer his Lowness, the Evil One, a.k.a. Satan, he's hovering over the world enjoying his handiwork. He's over Pakistan, see, and he loves the chaos. He floats over to Afghanistan and it's so ugly he's delighted. Passing over Iran he smiles and laughs out loud over Iraq. All's going so terrible that he's very proud of his work. Passing over Jordan things seem to be looking down, which is up for the Evil One, too. But then he looks over at us – he does a lot of overtime with us, you understand, but last summer he looks at us and he's in shock.

"Oh, my evilness!" He exclaims. "What's happening with those Israelis? Why aren't they bickering and fighting?"

Satan sees the unity, the outpouring of togetherness one for each other, he sees the absolute strangers who show up in the hospitals, to visit wounded soldiers they don't know personally, and how they give of themselves, of their time and money, for those who defend us all. The Evil One puts his Evil Eye on the scene and sees the showering of gifts upon the un-expecting heads of soldiers, the solidarity, the love – and he's going crazy, see? He's thinking: "What am I to do??"

Now, remember the movie Salah Shabati? Salah staggers out of his tin roof hut into the rain crying out to God: "Master of the World! My wife is right: no job, no money, no apartment! Master of the World! Do something!" Then there's a crash of lightning that reveals a poster for elections – that's the solution.

So his Lowness sees a crash of hope: elections! What can be better to break down the unity and love in Israel… than elections!" That's what I hear from the wise old man in line in front of me.

It really is up to us to decide. Elections are when we are supposed to go beyond the screen, each one of us by ourselves alone, but really all together we decide who will run our beloved country. We don't all agree on everything – so we go to vote for representatives. They'll sit in the Knesset and argue, which is good, if the argument is for the sake of goodness and to clarify the issues. All the Knesset members together run our country, both the coalition, who do the actual business, and the opposition, who are there to challenge the coalition's way of thinking. If we go to elections together to choose together people that will run the country – then the unity isn't really harmed. But if we go to elections thinking all the truth and justice is only in my party, and everyone else is a menace to society – then we may be harming the unity that is one of the foundations of our lives.

So let us choose: let us choose our representatives, let us choose unity and not divisiveness. Let us choose to be on topic and not on insult, let us choose not to hate, but rather to love, in spite - and sometimes because – of all the differences.

P.S. One other thing: I don't want to say anything bad about someone, but some of the names of the parties are annoying. For instance: Kulanu, All of US - is that a name for a party? Is that party really all of us?? Or "the nation is with us" - only with you? The Jewish Home - and anyone outside that party isn't Jewish? The Zionist Camp - are they the only Zionists? Kulanu means just that: not a party, not a faction, but all of us, and all of us vote a whole bunch of different parties. As salad goes well with dressing democracy goes better with tolerance. Peace to all of us!

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