The Muslim religious officials in Jerusalem are railing and ranting against the new security measures – metal detectors and soon to be installed security cameras – at the entrances to the Temple Mount. They claim this is a desecration of the holiness of the site.

They lie.

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Mecca hosts a multitude of metal detectors around the entrances to the holy site of Islam, the Kaaba, as well as security cameras, and each pilgrim must wear a bracelet so they can be monitored by the Saudi security forces.

The Muslim religious leaders in Jerusalem are calling on the faithful not to walk through the metal detectors, placed there for no good reason.

They lie.

The metal detectors have been placed because last Friday three Arab Muslims used the Temple Mount to launch a cowardly attack against policemen on guard there. The terrorists rushed out from the Temple Mount compound with two rifles and a pistol, shooting two policemen in the back. Apparently, in the eyes of the Muslim religious officials, this isn't desecration of the holy site. Perhaps the opposite is true in their eyes – it's a holy deed to kill Israelis, whether they be Jewish or, as in this case, Druze.

They claim Israel is taking over the holy site, desecrating the mosque, and call on all true Muslims to stop this desecration.
They've been telling this particular lie for almost a century from time to time, causing riots and violence.

Why do they do this, the Muslim leaders, the Arab leaders? For one main simple reason:

Arab Muslims do not share. They think they should rule the world and all non-Muslims should be subservient to them, as dhimmis, second-class barely-tolerated people.

The Arabs were promised independence and 99% of the demised Ottoman Empire's former lands in the Middle East. Just 1% was to be reserved for the Jews – the ancient Jewish homeland.

The Arabs refused; they don't share.

The Jews were building up the land, benefitting the Arabs too, but the Arabs rioted. The British Peel Commission suggested partition, with a tiny Jewish state, everything else going to the Arabs.

They refused. They don't share.

In 1948 the U.N. again suggested a partition; the Jews again agreed to share their homeland.

The Arabs refused; they don't share.

The Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron is holy to three religions, with a massive building over the cave built by the king of the Jews over 2,000 years ago. Yet while Muslims ruled the Holy Land they denied Jews entrance to the grave-site of the patriarchs and matriarchs of the Jewish people. Why?

Arab-Muslims don't share.

Jews prayed at the Western Wall, a remnant of the Second Temple complex built by the king of the Jews over 2,000 years ago. The Muslims didn't allow the Jews to bring benches for the people praying there, old or young, or to set up a curtain to separate man and women during prayers as is the Jewish tradition in prayer, or allow the Jews to place prayer-books or an ark to hold a Torah scroll there. Muslims with their donkeys "just happened" to pass through the Jewish people exactly as they were praying; Muslims later found no other spot to build a public toilet. Why?

Arab-Muslims don't share.

With the Jordanian invasion in 1948 and the occupation of the Old City of Jerusalem the Jewish residents were all expelled. Almost all of the synagogues in the Old City were either destroyed or desecrated in some other fashion. Despite the Jordanians having signed an armistice agreement that obligated them to allow Jews to visit the holy Western Wall and to pray there – Jews were denied access. Why?

Arab-Muslims don't share.

Jews are denied their rights to pray on the Temple Mount, as are Christians, because the Arab Muslims refuse to allow them to pray there, threatening riots and violence if anyone non-Muslim dares to pray on the Temple Mount. Why?

Arab Muslims don't share.

It's hard to respect the religion of people who have no respect for others. It's hard to have empathy for those who have no empathy for others. It's hard to make peace with those who don't want peace.

It's hard to share with a people who don't share.

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