10 reasons not to be an Israeli prosecutor

By ABIGAIL KLEIN
August 26, 2010 16:29
1 minute read.

10) Despite overtime, clothing allowance and rejuvenation days, salaries are low.

9) There are no jury trials.

8) Israeli prosecutors have to petition the Supreme Court every three months to keep a defendant in jail pending/during trial.

7) There is no yearly budget for each of the prosecutor’s offices in the state. Therefore, all operating expenses and requests for expenditures must be approved by the Office of the Justice Ministry and all forfeiture funds go directly to state programs.

6) Since there is no grand jury, Israeli prosecutors must draw up an indictment within five days of the receipt of the file from the police department and defendants must be tried within nine months of indictment.

5) There is no security in the courtrooms unless defendant is in custody.

4) Poor and lenient sentencing laws allow for maximum sentences but not minimum sentences unless it is a sexual offense.


3) Trial witnesses must stand during their testimony unless they request permission to sit.

2) If a defendant is found not guilty after trial, he/she may sue the government for civil compensation.

i.e. loss of job or divorce, etc.

1) After serving one third of their sentence, convicted defendants are permitted to go on vacation from jail beginning with eight hours and up to 72 hours.


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