One floor below street level, in a quiet Jerusalem neighborhood, a small classroom fills with the sounds of 20-somethings wrestling with an ancient Jewish text. Their brows furrow as they discuss, argue, retrace their steps and argue again. Like students in any yeshiva, they embody the old cliché: two Jews, three opinions.

One student wears the knitted kippa associated with modern Orthodoxy, another the black velvet common to more right-leaning yeshivot. A large white kippa with Rabbi Nachman of Breslov’s name sits atop the head of another student, and still another wears a black hat.

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