3,000-year-old tombs discovered in Egypt

By
February 20, 2007 21:17




Archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled the tombs of a pharaonic butler and scribe that have been buried for more than 3,000 years - proof, one says, that Egypt's sands still have secrets to reveal. Although archaeologists have been exploring Egypt intensively for more than 150 years, some estimate only one-third of what lies underground in Saqqara, site of the country's most ancient pyramid, has been uncovered. "The sands of Saqqara reveal lots of secrets," said Egypt's antiquities chief, Zahi Hawass, as he showed reporters a 4,000-year-old mud brick tomb that belonged to a scribe of divine records, Ka-Hay, and his wife. The tomb, along with the butler's 3,350-year-old limestone grave and two painted coffins, were discovered earlier this year at Saqqara near the famous Step Pyramid of King Djoser - the oldest of Egypt's more than 90 pyramids.


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