France calls on Syria to cooperate with IAEA inspectors

By JPOST.COM STAFF
September 8, 2010 22:18

Western officials bothered by suspicions regarding possible covert activities at alleged Syrian nuclear reactor site bombed by Israel in 2007.

2 minute read.



Satellite photos showing suspected Syrian nuclear

syria nuclear reactor site 311. (photo credit: Courtesy ISIS)

France on Wednesday called on Syria to show more transparency in its dealings with the International Atomic Energy Agency concerning its the site of a suspected nuclear reactor it was allegedly building before it was destroyed in an Israeli air strike. The IAEA issued a report earlier this week claiming that Syria had refused to allow agency inspectors to visit the site.

"[The IAEA report] tackles the recent IAEA-Syria developments according to the general warranty agreement concluded by Syria. However, there are still some pending issues, namely regarding the nature of the Dair Alzour site," said a French foreign ministry spokesperson. "France backs all IAEA check-up activities and calls on Syria to show the concrete cooperation and transparency needed to shed light on its past and current nuclear activities."

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On Tuesday, the US representative to the IAEA said that the organization may consider a special inspection of Syria to answer nagging questions over its nuclear activities.

Glyn Davies said a number of countries on the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors support plans to invoke the rarely used sanction.

Like Iran, Syria is suspected of hiding weapons-related nuclear activities and has blocked access to a suspected nuclear site destroyed by Israeli warplanes in September 2007.

"We need to keep the focus very much on Iran — but stay tuned on Syria, because Syria I think would love to just stave off any serious action to get to the bottom of what they were doing," Davies told reporters in London.

A recent IAEA report said that uranium particles found at the Dair Alzour desert facility indicate possible covert nuclear activities. The finding supported Western allegations that the bombed target was a nearly completed nuclear reactor which the US alleges was of North Korean design and intended to produce weapons-grade plutonium.

On Tuesday, the US representative to the IAEA said that the organization may consider a special inspection of Syria to answer nagging questions over its nuclear activities.

Glyn Davies said a number of countries on the UN's International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors support plans to invoke the rarely used sanction.

Like Iran, Syria is suspected of hiding weapons-related nuclear activities and has blocked access to a suspected nuclear site destroyed by Israeli warplanes in September 2007.

"We need to keep the focus very much on Iran — but stay tuned on Syria, because Syria I think would love to just stave off any serious action to get to the bottom of what they were doing," Davies told reporters in London.

A recent IAEA report said that uranium particles found at the Dair Alzour desert facility indicate possible covert nuclear activities. The finding supported Western allegations that the bombed target was a nearly completed nuclear reactor which the US alleges was of North Korean design and intended to produce weapons-grade plutonium.


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