Jpost Letters to Editor: Police negligence?

By
August 1, 2015 22:59

Did it not occur to anyone in the police that there was some possibility that he would repeat his crime?




Letters

Letters. (photo credit: REUTERS)

Police negligence?
Incompetence, shortsightedness, or plain criminal negligence? I’m trying to comprehend the police mindset, after reading in your report of Thursday’s atrocity that “Judea and Samaria police were not required to track [Yishai] Schlissel...
because he committed his crime in Jerusalem” (“Man stabs 6 at Jerusalem Gay Pride Parade,’ July 31). If so, why didn’t they alert the Jerusalem police to look out for him? An avowed hater of the LGBT community, Schlissel was released a mere three weeks ago.

Did it not occur to anyone in the police that there was some possibility that he would repeat his crime? My heart goes out to the injured, and to the gentle, happy people who wanted nothing more than to enjoy their parade.

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SHULA BERMAN Efrat

Bad image
First the stabbing at the gay parade, and then the burning and murder of a child. We must stop the actions in the name of religious-nationalism now, hitting them hard and for good. In addition to being tragic, painful atrocities, what is happening in Israel is making Jews all over the world look bad.

STEVEN ROSS New York

Pollard’s release

Regarding the announcement that Jonathan Pollard is slated to be set free (“Pollard to be released Nov. 20,” July 29), while it was truly wonderful to learn that Pollard will finally be released from prison after serving 30 years of his life sentence, there was a catch. Pollard will not be allowed to move to Israel for the next five years. Unfortunately that means that places like Tel Aviv or Eilat are no-go areas for Pollard until 2020. However, given that the US State Department does not recognize Jerusalem as part of Israel, surely the US government should have no objections to Pollard moving to our unrecognized capital city the day after he is freed from prison.

KENNY FISHER Jerusalem

The granting of parole to Jonathan Pollard does not meet the conditions of The Jerusalem Post’s excellent editorial in the Friday paper (“Don’t parole Pollard,” July 31) calling for Pollard “to be set free.” It is up to Pollard’s talented pro-bono attorneys, Elliot Lauer and Jacques Semmelman, to change that condition.

The same edition of the paper has the informative article of former MK Dov Lipman (“The lesson of Jonathan Pollard,” July 31). Yes, Rabbi Lipman , I agree with you that “Thank God,Jonathan will now be free.” But sorry rabbi, I cannot agree with your assertion that five presidents kept “Pollard in jail because of his love of America” and “to protect the United States of America.”

Loyalty to America is fine, but America’s judicial system does not have to close its eyes to compassion and mercy.

LEONARD KAHN Zichron Yaakov

Stubborn ministers
Let me understand: The coalition- sponsored “Norwegian law” was passed by a large margin, and yet Likud ministers now refuse to honor their own bill (“Likud ministers don’t want to quit for potential MKs,’ July 31).

And things get even more confusing with Bayit Yehudi’s creative compromise of a new and very Israeli version of ‘musical chairs,’ where ultimately the same ministers will return and remain as MKs after six months.

What happened to all the lofty ideals and principles espoused by the prime minister on down regarding the law’s importance, and even necessity, for enhancing democracy, separation- of-powers and more effective governing? It seems clear to me – any potential legislative stability and real interest in serving the people are more than eclipsed by the personal interests of power, perks and control.

GERSHON HARRIS Hatzor Haglilit

Chunnel chaff

In “Man dies in Chunnel as migrant crisis deepens,” (July 16), the Reuters report states that Britain is “pressing ahead with erecting a three-meter fence” to protect against the entry of thousands of illegal migrants. Does this mean that the land that was my home for 60 years is now joining Israel as “an apartheid state”? After all, their would-be entrants are merely seeking better economic conditions, while some of those who would like to enter Israel have far worse goals in mind.

LESLIE PORTNOY Netanya

Palestinian state
Not content with the Obama/ Kerry-led deal that imperils Israel by making avowed genocidal Iran a threshold nuclear power, Tal Harris calls on Barack Obama to support UN recognition of a Palestinian state (“President Obama: It is now time for Palestinian statehood,” July 29). This demand is being made while PA leaders endlessly deny Jewish history and lionize “martyrs” who murder innocent Israelis and Americans.

Harris says that symbolic recognition of a Palestinian state would “do no harm.” Yet we witness with growing alarm developments since the UN granted the PA non-member observer status – repeated attempts to haul Israel before the ICC; a burgeoning BDS movement; the EU’s decision to require labeling of Israeli products from the “occupied Palestinian territories.” Why would the PA enter into meaningful negotiations when it can achieve virtually everything it wants through international pressure on only one party to the dispute? Harris notes Obama’s reference to shared values. If Harris is truly interested in shared values, he should support conditioning future assistance to the PA on a free and fair election, an end to violence and incitement, and recognition of Israel as the nation state of the Jewish people.

Once those conditions are met, Israel will happily resume negotiations with the PA.

EFRAIM A. COHEN Zichron Yaacov

Isi and Abe
Once again, kudos to Isi Leibler for being such a mensch regarding Abe Foxman (“Abe Foxman’s retirement: End of an era,” July 29). Rather than let ego get in the way, he tells it like it is. If only there were more people as clear, honest, and straight forward as he is.

RIVKA ZAHAVY Jerusalem

Amnesty’s flaws
Regarding the story “Israel calls Amnesty report on Gaza war ‘flawed’” (July 30), the real question that should be asked is if Amnesty International itself has committed a crime against humanity.

By failing to report the “indiscriminate attacks” of rocket fire on civilians in Israel, Amnesty has once again shown it is working hand in hand with a terrorist group – Hamas.

We also see that Amnesty only reports about governments but never about the cause of the problem which is indiscriminate “crimes against humanity” by terrorist groups. When has a report by Amnesty reported on crimes committed by ISIS, Hamas, Boko Haram, al-Qaida, Hezbollah? All terrorist groups violate human rights but Amnesty seems blind to this simple fact. Is this a case of attacking the target that won’t hit back or just inconsistency an Amnesty’s part?

MICHAEL H. DAVIS Jerusalem

Free speech?
Sheikh Khaled al-Maghrab tells children that “a martyr is absolved with the first drop of his blood” and emphasizes that Muslims who protect the mosque and sleep in for 30 days “are awarded 70 virgins” (“Sheikh promotes martyrdom to kids,” July 29). These statements and more to children under the age of 10 in front of Border Police officers went unhindered. If that is not incitement, what is? Which country in the world, democratic or not, would tolerate such behavior without taking legal action? Free speech does not include incitement. When are we going to respond and act as a responsible state? We can no longer tolerate anti-Semitism too in the name of “freedom of speech.”

YECHIEL WIND Holon


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