Waning support

I have been a staunch supporter of Israel for decades, but this support is waning rapidly.

By
April 2, 2015 23:11
3 minute read.
Letters

Letters. (photo credit: REUTERS)

Waning support

You note the visit to Israel by US Speaker of the House John Boehner (“PM: Powers talk with Iran even as it threatens Israel,” April 2).

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I must say that the recent visit to the US by Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu angered me deeply. The biggest issue for me has been the insults Boehner and his party continuously hurl at our president, and how Mr. Netanyahu fanned those flames for his own personal gain of reelection. It was rude, arrogant and insulting.

According numerous reports, since 1949, Israel has received close to a quarter of a trillion dollars in foreign aid from the United States.

Yet we get insulted by your prime minister! And Mr. Netanyahu is dictating terms to us regarding Iran! What gall! In his book The Missing Peace, Dennis Ross, chief US Middle East peace negotiator under presidents George W. Bush and Bill Clinton, concludes that Yasser Arafat stonewalled due to his ego and the fear of losing his “player status” if peace accords were signed. Mr. Netanyahu is your Arafat.

Good luck with that.

I have been a staunch supporter of Israel for decades, but this support is waning rapidly.

GERALD J. NIEDERMAIER
Gladstone, Michigan

Dream team

With regard to “Kahlon expands coalition demands” (April 2), “I am a man of the right,” Kulanu leader Moshe Kahlon has said.

He cannot stomach bringing his party into a coalition led by Isaac Herzog of the Zionist Union.

He has a choice, though, but the choice will have to be initiated by Herzog, who recently told The New York Times that he was moving his party to the center, which is the only way to win an election.

Herzog doesn’t have to wait four years. He can tell Kahlon right now: “Join me, Tzipi Livni, Yair Lapid in a government of the center.

You will be prime minister. I will be minister of defense, Lapid will retain the finance ministry and Livni will be minister of interior.”

He can add: “We will bring in Arye Deri of Shas, who will be much more comfortable dealing with us than with Netanyahu. Avigdor Liberman might want to join, but we don’t need his votes. I believe you would prefer fellow Kulanu MK Michael Oren as minister of foreign affairs. As Meretz and the joint Arab party will support us in a vote of confidence, we will have a majority with or without Liberman.”

Does anyone think Kahlon would reject leading a coalition of this type? Netanyahu will not have the votes for a coalition without him. All Kahlon has to do is refuse his offer. President Reuven Rivlin will then call on Herzog to form a government, and Herzog will ask Rivlin to name his old Likud pal to form a government.

Kahlon’s beautiful coalition could appoint Zionist Union MK Stav Shaffir minister of housing so she could build what she lobbied for in the tent protests of the summer of 2011. What a beautiful thought.

J. ZEL LURIE

Delray Beach, Florida

CLARIFICATION Mention of Theodore Roosevelt, and not Franklin D. Roosevelt, as president of the US before and during the Holocaust in “I voted Likud” (Comment & Features, March 31) was due to an error made by an editor, rather than by writer Beryl Ratzer. We apologize for any misperceptions our April 1 correction might have caused.

CORRECTION The Germanwings aircraft involved in the recent crash in the French Alps was an Airbus A320, and not as stated in the McClatchy Washington Bureau/TNS piece “Deliberate crash of German plane highlights gaps in how pilots are screened” (Comment & Features, March 31).


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