Cartoonist lambasts Trump over Charlottesville comments

After violent clashes in Charlottesville in which one woman died, US president denounced violence ‘on many sides.'

By
August 13, 2017 07:58
2 minute read.
US President Donald Trump holds a rally with supporters in an arena in Youngstown, Ohio, US July 2

US President Donald Trump holds a rally with supporters in an arena in Youngstown, Ohio, US July 25, 2017. . (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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US President Donald Trump has been strongly criticized on the news - and on the internet - following his statement on the violent protests in Charlottesville, Virginia this weekend.

In a televised announcement, Trump told reporters that he condemned the "hatred, bigotry and violence on many sides.'' Trump's decision not to specifically condemn the white supremacy rally where the violence occurred has earned him scorn.

John Cole, a Pennsylvania-based editorial cartoonist, tweeted four drawings. One depicted a man wearing a 'Make America Great Again' hat - a hallmark of Trump's campaign and presidency - with a Hitler-esque mustache, standing in front of an American flag while performing a Nazi salute. Another showed Trump standing in front of a crowd of KKK members and other assumed white supremacists, with his arms opened to a Black couple, encouraging them to join him. One of the cartoons was a play on the film The Producers, in which a Jewish accountant helps produce a play about the 'happy home life of Hitler.'


Trump's statement that ''we are all Americans'' drew criticism from many people.

The original rally, called ''Unite the Right," was headlined by prominent white nationalists and neo-Nazis, including Richard Spencer and Jason Kessler. The organizers called the protest against what they saw was an infringement on the rights of white Americans, and a perceived special treatment of people of color and immigrants. The organizers also made explicit their support of the confederacy movement, a modern reincarnation of the original Confederacy. 


The Confederacy was a union of slave-holding states that sought to secede from the United States, which led to the American Civil War.

Virginia was an important state in the Confederacy and throughout the South, the memory of the Civil War is a complex issue that deals with states’ rights, racial relations, and politics.

One of the more famous cartoons associated with the alt-right and the neo-Nazi movement during Trump's campaign was Pepe the Frog, who reportedly made a few appearances at this weekend's rally.

An alt-right protestor holds a sign depicting Pepe the Frog

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