DANCE REVIEW: The Hole

The Hole is a site-specific creation for Batsheva’s largest studio, an intimate setting, despite its size.

By ORA BRAFMAN
April 14, 2013 00:01
1 minute read.
Gat Dance Company

Dance Company 370. (photo credit: courtesy Emanuel Gat)

 
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Ohad Naharin’s new creation, The Hole, is going to be yet another gem in his crown.

The dancer-choreographer who has maintained international stature for over 20 years, is the emblematic leader of Israel’s contemporary dance scene. The man has got talent and wells of creative power.

The Hole is a site-specific creation for Batsheva’s largest studio, an intimate setting, despite its size. A large raised octagonal wooden floor dominates the central space. With three row of chairs around it, the proximity shows the every muscular ripple, each drop of sweat.

Generally, it is the female dancers who take the lead in this production. On the night I attend, however, the eight male dancers dominate the stage while the eight women stay close to the back wall, behind the audience, isolated, playing a secondary, more decorative role. Towards the end, they get token action: to crawl under the ceiling on a grid of pipes. Naharin, a great master of his craft, some say a wizard, likes to mix things up.

Although The Hole, with all its exceptional craftsmanship, does leave a faint taste of rather dogmatic structure, the original stage, the exceptionally composed movement and the refined dancers create endless visual stimuli.

The Hole
Batsheva Dance Company
Studio Varda, April 4

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