Dance Review: 4 Men

Three very strong female dancers took part in the third piece, choreographed and danced by Hillel Kogan.

dance review 88 (photo credit:)
dance review 88
(photo credit: )
4 Men Tmuna Theater Tel Aviv February 16 Over time, the Tmuna theater - once a center of purely fringe dance, music and theatrical works - has turned into a buzzing hub of creative energy with an off-beat atmosphere. On its stages, independent choreographers have found more ways of reaching audiences in a less formal and less demanding environment. Perhaps it was the informal setting, or maybe the intimate floor space, but the first performance of the evening entitled "Mechanical Trio in Warm Land" seemed to be less intense, looser and funnier than it was when Yossi Berg and Oded Graf staged it a few months ago on Suzanne Dellal's stage. Featuring dancer Tali Peretz-Laor alongside Berg and Graf, it is one of last season's best works. "The Axis of Shlomi Biton" is also a trio performance, but Biton commands its main axis alone, with precise, clean, and naturally elegant moves. He has the stealthy, fluid qualities of a martial arts master, but his movements didn't quite mesh with his two female co-dancers in this piece. Regardless of the evening's name, three very strong female dancers took part in the third piece, choreographed and danced by Hillel Kogan. In "After the Bolero," Kogan displays his unique, versatile and highly expressive dancing. This piece projected some of his well-known personal traits - it was inventive, highly theatrical and laced with a few surreal twists. Performed by a powerful team, the dance had memorable moments, but ultimately ended with too many loose ends.