Furo is the result of a collaboration between Tabaimo and Ohad Naharin, a master of choreographic challenges.'>

Dance Review: Furo

Batsheva's Furo is the result of a collaboration between Tabaimo and Ohad Naharin, a master of choreographic challenges.

By ORA BRAFMAN
June 23, 2008 11:16
1 minute read.
dance 88

dance review 88. (photo credit: )

Batsheva Dance Company Furo Tel Aviv port June 14 Welcome to Furo, the Japanese-style communal bathhouse where the animated action drawn by Japanese artist Tabaimo takes place. Batsheva's Furo is the result of a collaboration between Tabaimo and Ohad Naharin, a master of choreographic challenges always on the lookout for new ways to surprise himself. Furo also gained an important element in the form of music by soundtrack maverick Ohad Fishoff. The three rocketed east-west fused popular culture to new heights. And the result is a perpetual performance like no other, where the animated film, screened on three walls of the temporary pavilion constructed for Furo, play in a loop for hours, and two Batsheva dancers change every 45 minutes. Its unusual setting and artistic materials defy conventions. The center stage is occupied by dozens of yellow plastic bowls that are used in traditional baths in Japan. The dancers stay mostly on two narrow podiums at the sides of the room, like dancing gatekeepers. The central element needs no contextual environment; it is the stunningly animated film with its huge, strong images; they make the work of the two dancers doubly hard. Surprisingly, they manage to dig up brilliant, expressive ways to dance in their confined space. It always amazes me how constrictions bring about brilliant solutions. Furo invented its own niche as a dance-installation, not to be missed by any art lover.


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