Dance Review: 'Makarova Kabisa'

With frequent body contortions, whipping torsos and hips surging spastically, the dancers appeared to be operating under a hypnotic spell.

dance 88 (photo credit:)
dance 88
(photo credit: )
Batsheva Dance Company Makarova Kabisa Suzanne Dellal February 25 D.J. Uri Lichtik started playing his dance-set at full volume as Makarova Kabisa began. Sharon Eyal, veteran dancer and aspiring choreographer, matched Lichtik's musical set with dancing that was ruthless, aggressive and full of frenzy, often using the same type of movements she has used and reused in the past (particularly in Quiet Village and Bertolina). With frequent body contortions, whipping torsos and hips surging spastically, the dancers appeared to be operating under a hypnotic spell that lulled their individual will. The repeated movements and primal rhythms resembled tribal rituals that shifted from fertility rites to the exorcist sacraments of a semi-conscious troop. In an attempt to retain this effect, Eyal kept her dancers in tight groups or regimented structures. However, in the few instances where she unleashed short solos, or focused on other smaller groups, she failed to justify her artistic choice. The stage for Makarova Kabisa was austere - bare black with intrusive, harsh neon lights. The men wore off-white satin boxer shorts and the female dancers wore similar attire that was unflattering in cut and choice of material. Overall, one senses that the dedicated dancers of Batsheva deserved better - in every respect.