Theater Review: <I>Not by Bread Alone</I>

During the kneading, shaping, rising and baking of bread, the 11 deaf and blind actors of Nalaga'at play their pain, dreams and fantasies for the audience.

Theater Review 88 (photo credit:)
Theater Review 88
(photo credit: )
Not by Bread Alone Directed by Adina Tal Nalaga'at Theater June 24 This is theater at its most pure, the kind of theater that may have happened before man became verbal, before artifice became art, before it accreted ritual or the "willing suspension of disbelief." During the kneading, shaping, rising and baking of bread, the 11 deaf and blind actors of Nalaga'at play their pain, dreams and fantasies for the audience they cannot see or hear, and whose applause they sense because their guides/translators pat their shoulders. Some talk, some do not, but all are eloquent because all speak the truth of their hearts. They move assuredly about the stage, they are comfortable with their actions, they communicate with the audience, they perform. They are professional. They are also infinitely moving because they so infinitely believe. Each of the cast offers unique moments, but among them Batsheva Rabanseri's graceful body language and Mark Yaroski's clowning stand out.