Corrie play finds home in NY

A play about a young American student who was killed by an Israeli bulldozer in Gaza will open in New York, just months after another theater pulled the show from its schedule, drawing charges of censorship.

By AP
June 26, 2006 11:21
1 minute read.
rachel corrie 88 298

rachel corrie 88 298. (photo credit: AP)

 
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A play about a young American student who was killed by an Israeli bulldozer in Gaza will open in New York in October, several months after another theater pulled the show from its schedule, drawing charges of censorship. Producers Pam Pariseau and Dena Hammerstein said that they will present the U.S. premiere of London's Royal Court Theatre production of the one-woman show My Name Is Rachel Corrie at the Minetta Lane Theatre. Previews are scheduled to start on Oct. 5 for a 48-performance run scheduled to end Oct. 15. Director Alan Rickman and Katherine Viner, features editor of The Guardian newspaper in London, put the one-woman play together from the diaries, letters and e-mails of Corrie, a 23-year-old member of the International Solidarity Movement, who died in the southern Gaza town of Rafah in March 2003. Rachel Corrie returned for a limited run at London's Playhouse Theatre in the West End this spring after the New York Theatre Workshop, one of the city's leading off-Broadway spaces, indefinitely suspended a production scheduled to open in March. An Israeli investigation ruled Corrie's death to be accidental. Since then, Corrie has become a divisive figure in the United States, with supporters hailing her bravery and commitment and opponents condemning her as foolish and naive.

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