Cultural exposure for new olim

The purpose of this project is to make Israel's leading plays "more accessible to newcomers all over Israel," said Tamar Abromowitz, spokesperson for the Ministry of Immigration Absorption.

By BRIANNA AMES
February 9, 2006 08:07

 
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In November 2005 the Ministry of Immigrant Absorption in partnership with the cultural organization Omanut L' Am launched a new program called "Through the Theater." The purpose of this project is to make Israel's leading plays "more accessible to newcomers all over Israel," said Tamar Abromowitz, spokesperson for the Ministry of Immigration Absorption. The newest play in the series is called "Israeli Family," and is being put on by the Haifa Theatre Company. Written by Boaz Gaon, and directed by Moshe Naor, the play is a comedy about an Israeli family that represents every facet of Israeli society and life. Dealing with issues such as "being Israeli, defining what an Israeli is, and what is the Israeli prototype," Abromowitz explained that the play is part of the Ministry's "inter-cultural exposure" policy, which aims to expose both new olim and Israelis alike, to each other's distinct cultures. "Israeli Family" premiered Sunday night in Ashkelon. Every play featured as part of the project travels to 15 cities across Israel and is simultaneously translated into Russian. Tickets are subsidized to ensure all plays are accessible to everyone. For more details and a schedule of upcoming plays call 050 621 4708.

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