Dance Review

Since its inception five years ago, the Beersheba based Kamea Dance Company has maintained its particular, if somewhat dated niche, due mostly to the choreographic colors of its artistic director Tamir Ginz.

By ORA BRAFMAN
August 15, 2007 08:48

 
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Kamea Dance Company The Naked Truth Suzanne Dellal August 9 Since its inception five years ago, the Beersheba based Kamea Dance Company has maintained its particular, if somewhat dated niche, due mostly to the choreographic colors of its artistic director Tamir Ginz. The Naked Truth, like most of his earlier pieces, has a story behind it. This time it deals with the betrayal of his spouse. To portray the fragility of love, Ginz used porcelain figurines as his central image, a delicate yet brittle product of bygone naivete. Costume designer Maor Zabar did his best to comply with that image and at the same time keep contemporary feel to his ornate clothing by adding even more detail. Unfortunately the result did a serious disservice to the dancers and the work as a whole. Perhaps if the work itself was extremely compelling, one wouldn't notice the ungainly clothes, but the piece was as choreographically cluttered as the wardrobe. The 12 young dancers, however, did their best to keep up with the choreographic load and its stylistic excessiveness. Ginz didn't leave one emotion known to the human race unturned; instant pathos was often employed rather than taking the time to build up to an emotional climax.

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