Dance Review: Adama Dance Company

Twelve beautifully attired dancers came on the makeshift stage at Suzanne Dellal and placed themselves ceremoniously around the stage.

By ORA BRAFMAN
August 7, 2007 09:25
1 minute read.
Dance Review: Adama Dance Company

dance 88. (photo credit: )

Adama Dance Company Dream Prince Suzanne Dellal August 2 Watching Liat Dror and partner Nir Ben Gal's latest creation "Dream Prince" makes it hard to believe that they were once the leading choreographic duo around, paving the way for a whole generation of contemporary dance creators. Their Two Room Apartment full evening duet launched their career abroad, but after years of hard work, they moved to Mitzpe Ramon to explore new ways of more spiritual, communal life. They changed the name of their company to Adama (Earth) and drastically changed their artistic targets and style. Dream Prince is their most ambitious production of their New-Age phase, yet it encountered difficulties in bridging ideological dogmas with its choice of artistic tools. Twelve beautifully attired dancers came on the makeshift stage at Suzanne Dellal and placed themselves ceremoniously around the stage. Their white layered dress-coats conjured images of Tatar warriors or other ancient Asian tribes that practiced group rituals based on martial arts and folkloric traditions. Soon the dance veered off on a cultural tour accompanied by frequent dress changes and a succession of style, ending in a faux Yemenite dance. This exposed the Achilles' heel of the choreography. Despite several small pleasing scenes, the semi-folkloric outcome failed to fulfill its artistic objectives, partially because its movement expressions were too literal and partly because scenes, such as the sticks-dance, were simplistic to a fault.


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