Dance Review: Swan Lake

Swan Lake is a perfect vehicle for a classical ballet company to flush its feathers and there is almost no other company in the world that can surpass the brilliance and grace of the classical Russian style of the Kirov Ballet.

By ORA BRAFMAN
March 19, 2007 09:25
1 minute read.

 
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'Swan Lake' The Mariinsky Theater (Kirov Ballet) TAPAC March 16 Swan Lake is a perfect vehicle for a classical ballet company to flush its feathers and there is almost no other company in the world that can surpass the brilliance and grace of the classical Russian style of the Kirov Ballet. The ballet, choreographed by Marius Petipa and Lev Ivanov and set to music by Tchaikovsky, premiered in 1877. Yet it can still thrill and deeply touch us with the sheer beauty of its romance, as pure love faces the dark powers of desire, deception and betrayal. The double role of Odette-Odill, the white swan and the black swan under the spell of the menacing magician Rothbart, is one of the ballet's most gratifying. Traditionally, the same prima ballerina portrays both roles and can project her supple, ethereal, and most delicate qualities to both acts. Victoria Tereshkina, who played the double lead roles, was as delicate as a butterfly dancing the role of the white swan Odette, and duly sinister as Odille, the black swan. She was a lovely and impressive virtuoso dancer. Fortunately, we got to see the young and handsome Vladimir Shklyarov as the charmed Prince Siegfried, who was a wonderful partner with high jumps and soft landings. The Kirov's revised choreography by Konstantin Sergeyev added delightful group scenes, danced by the most exceptional corps of dancers around.

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