News of the Muse

Stolen Hebrew manuscript recovered.

By JTA, AP, JERUSALEM POST STAFF
March 21, 2007 09:01
2 minute read.

 
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Stolen Hebrew manuscript recovered A Hebrew manuscript stolen from the Bibliotheque nationale de France has been returned. A 13th century Bible, referred to as H breu 23, had been stolen from the national library's collection in 2000 allegedly by a former curator, Michel Garel, and sold to a London art dealer, David Sofer. It was returned earlier this month. In March 2006, Garel was found guilty of the theft of another manuscript, H breu 52, and his appeal was denied in January. He was sentenced to 15 months in prison. H breu 52 was returned to the national library in January by an American art dealer. JTA 'Striped Pyjamas' honored in Ireland A children's book about the relationship in Auschwitz between a young inmate and the commandant's son has won two prizes at the Irish Book Awards. John Boyne's The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas won children's book of the year and a people's choice award after spending 40 weeks at No. 1 on the Irish bestseller list. It has been nominated for numerous prizes in the United Kingdom, United States and Italy. The novel tells the story of Bruno, the young son of Auschwitz's new commandant, who escapes loneliness by befriending Shmuel across the wire in the camp. The book has been a major global success for Boyne, who also has written four works of adult literary fiction - none of which have approached the popularity of his children's story. The Boy in the Striped Pyjamas has been translated into 24 languages, including Hebrew. Miramax is scheduled to start shooting the film version in Budapest in April. JTA Director Stuart Rosenberg dies at 79 Stuart Rosenberg, a prolific director of series television and theatrical films who partnered with Paul Newman on the popular prison drama Cool Hand Luke and several other movies, has died at 79. Rosenberg, who also directed The Amityville Horror, died of a heart attack Thursday at his home in Beverly Hills, according to his son, Benjamin. Rosenberg also directed Robert Redford in the 1980 prison film Brubaker and Mickey Rourke in 1984's The Pope of Greenwich Village. Amityville Horror in 1979 was probably his most financially successful film; it has inspired seven sequels to date. He collected more than 300 TV directing credits for such dramatic series as The Untouchables, Alfred Hitchcock Presents and The Twilight Zone. Rosenberg is survived by his wife, Margot, and son Benjamin, an assistant editor who worked with his father on many of his later films. AP Dosh draws crowds Hundreds of works by cartoonist Kariel Gardosh, better known as "Dosh", are being showcased at an exhibit at Tel Aviv's Land of Israel Museum. Born in 1921 in Budapest, Hungary, Dosh immigrated to Israel in 1948 and was drawn to cartooning because of his limited Hebrew. After learning the language, he chose to continue drawing, and became well known for his Srulik character who donned a classic Israeli round brimless hat. The Dosh exhibit spans 50 years of his work published in daily newspapers, including Davar Hashavua, Ashmoret, Ha'olam Hazeh, and Ma'ariv, where he began publishingin 1953 until his death in 2000. The exhibit will be open to the public until August 30. Jerusalem Post staff

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