Lest we forget

Not quite two year-old Ayella Lev-Ari placed flowers, together with her father Omer, at the Holocaust memorial statue at Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'emek on Holocaust Day, earlier this week.

By LYDIA AISENBERG
April 27, 2006 13:15
lest we gorget 88 298

lest we gorget 88 298. (photo credit: Lydia Aisenberg)

 
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Not quite two year-old Ayella Lev-Ari placed flowers, together with her father Omer, at the Holocaust memorial statue at Kibbutz Mishmar Ha'emek on Holocaust Day, earlier this week. Ayella is the granddaughter of Holocaust survivors and kibbutz members Rachel and Ehud Gewing, who made aliya in the early l950s. Ehud fled with his parents and brothers from their native Austria and found refuge in Shanghai, only to be rounded up with the rest of city's Jews and interned in harsh conditions until the end of the war. Rachel hails from the town of Mizotch that was part of Poland during the Holocaust and today in west Ukraine. The Gewing's children and grandchildren place flowers every year next to the smallest figure at the memorial site - a small child cowering in a crevice. "I survived the Holocaust as a child by hiding in such a small cramped space and it has become a family tradition for our children and children's children to place their six flowers by the child in the crevice," explained Rachel as she and Ehud watched Ayella follow tradition.

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