Nelson to lead Bach's B Minor Mass

The B Minor Mass was never written as a whole. Some scholars say that Bach wrote the Gloria for Christmas 1724 for his St. Thomas church in Leipzig.

By HELEN KAYE
March 2, 2006 07:38
bach 88

bach 88. (photo credit: )

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user uxperience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew, Ivrit
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Repor
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

John Nelson will conduct the Israel Chamber Orchestra for a six concert series of Bach's monumental B Minor Mass beginning March 15 and 16 at the Tel Aviv Museum. The Budapest Academy Choir will feature soprano Noemi Kiss, alto Edna Prochnik, tenor Timothy Bentch and bass Christian Immler. Nelson, currently music director of L'Ensemble Orchestral de Paris, is a recognized authority on the great oratorios, especially those by Bach. He is also a noted opera conductor and has conducted at the Metropolitan and Rome opera houses among others. The B Minor Mass was never written as a whole. Some scholars say that Bach wrote the Gloria for Christmas 1724 for his St. Thomas church in Leipzig. Then in 1733 he dedicated what would become two more segments of it to Friedrich August II, elector of Saxony. The more than two hour mass was not performed entire until 1859, more than a century after Bach's death. The other concerts are at the new Zichron Ya'akov Cultural Center (17/3), Petah Tikva (18/3), back at the museum (19/3) and Karmiel (21/3).

Related Content

Sarah Silverman
August 26, 2014
Jewish women take home gold at 2014 Emmys

By JTA