Sabra Sounds

Elisete is back with her 2nd album. While most Israelis do not pay attention to this Brazilian-Israeli singer, those who know of her understand that her talent is considerable.

By VIVA SARAH PRESS
March 12, 2006 09:21
2 minute read.
elisete disk 88 298

elisete disk 88 298. (photo credit: )

Elisete Longing (Gagua) (IMP Records) Elisete is back with her second album, Longing. While most Israelis do not pay attention to this Brazilian-Israeli singer, those who know of her understand that her talent is considerable. In tune with her debut album, Luar e Cafe, Elisete again offers charming ballads pleasing to the ear. Her music is a mesh of Bossa-Nova, samba, forro, baiao as well as pop and reggae rhythms, and her rich vocals switch easily between Portuguese and Hebrew. Her lyrics are simple but full of meaning. For example on "Love" (Track 8) she sings, "I want to say what I want without thinking of your censorship, everything is simple or maybe everything is confusing." Whereas most domestic indie music is being written in English, Elisete purposely chose to pen her tracks in Hebrew. And it works. Regardless of what she's singing her music makes you want to get up and dance. This is a feel-good album and Elisete's bubbling optimism is infectious. All 14 tracks are winners here. Longing is dedicated to the late songwriter Ehud Manor who supported Elisete in her musical aspirations. Overall, it is one of the most colorful albums to hit local record store shelves in a while. Roni Lo Otzeret II (Helicon/Pop Art) Part Two of Roni Superstar's album is now available on record store shelves. The album continues where Part One left off, offering seven tracks of modern electronic-dance-pop for the listener. This disc includes singles "Sukarya," "Bo Kvar," and "Lo Otzeret". The lyrics are again saccharine. On "Nesikhat Pop" she sings: "What's so bad about being a pop princess?/What's so bad about making people happy?/ Why does everything have to be deep?". Lo Otzeret II is a mix of local and foreign influences. As with her previous albums, much of Roni's music was written by foreign pop composers among them Adam Alvermark (Sweden), Max Fadeev (Russia), and Air Chrysalis (Scandinavia). Israelis Henree and Ivri Lider also help out. While her fans will indeed like her new offerings, it seems to this reviewer that her output is uninspired. The vocal reach on her songs is limited and uniform. In fact, the songs are so heavy on their electronic-dance beats that it doesn't really make a difference what Roni sounds like. It's almost as if her handlers are trying to cover up her voice. While each of the tracks here will be hits (they were packaged to be just that) it will be interesting to see if this tactic can survive another album. Lo Otzeret can be purchased as two EP albums or as one full album.


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