Learning the days of the week seems like basic content that every child should know and understand. However, children living in Israel have a hard time grasping the days of the week and understanding its order. I can understand why. In Hebrew the days of week are numbered, except for Saturday which is Shabbat. As well, the work week begins in Israel on Sunday while in other countries the work week begins on Monday. What happens is that Hebrew speaking children being to count the days of the week in Hebrew and try to correlate it to English, only to understand that the numbers don't match up. Here is where the confusion sets into play.

As the founder of Simplish- English Made Simple I have come up with a simple mnemonic (picture-word-association) to help remember the days of the week in English. I teach it to all my students and in a matter of minutes they understand it all!

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So here we go:



Sunday: In the word Sunday we hear the word sun. In Israel the week begins on Sunday and we always hope the week ahead will be sunny and bright.

Monday: In the word Monday we hear the word 'mon'. 'Mon' reminds the sound of the word money. Overseas (not in Israel) the week begins on Monday; "Money Monday".

Tuesday: In the word Tuesday we hear the word two. The second day of the week (in most countries).

Wednesday: In the word Wednesday we hear the word when? Wednesday is also known as "hump day" and we ask, "when will the weekend arrive?"

Thursday: Sorry folks, Thursday is just one of those days that we will have to remember for its silly name. At least it's only one.

Friday: In the word Friday we hear the word 'fry' as in a frying pan.  Since Friday in Israel is also the eve of the Shabbath I associate it with Shabbat dinner. We fry up the schnitzels on Friday for dinner.

Saturday: In the word Saturday we hear the word sat. In Israel Saturday is the day of rest where we sit and relax.
On Saturday we sat and relaxed.


Happy learning everyone and may your week be filled with sun, money, good things that come in two, inquisitive questions, silly moments, yummy fried schnitzel, and of course rest and relaxation.

Attached below is an info graph with the associated pictures. 

 

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