Facebook banned in Bangladesh over prophet drawings

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
May 30, 2010 14:35

 
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DHAKA, Bangladesh — The popular social networking website Facebook has been banned in Bangladesh because of a page that urged people to draw images of Islam's Prophet Muhammad.

Chief telecommunication regulator Zia Ahmed said Sunday that access to the site has been temporarily blocked because it was publishing caricatures that may hurt the religious sentiments of people in the Muslim-majority nation.Ahmed said the government had asked local Internet service providers to block the objectionable content, and that access to Facebook would be restored if the offending material was removed.



Muslims regard depictions of the prophet, even favorable ones, as blasphemous.

Pakistan also blocked Facebook on May 19 following a court order requiring the move.

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