Hurricane Earl threatens Massachusetts with wind, rain

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
September 4, 2010 04:34

 
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CHATHAM, Massachusetts  — A weakening but still dangerous Hurricane Earl steamed toward the gray-shingled cottages and fishing villages of Cape Cod on Friday night, disrupting people's vacations on the unofficial final weekend of the short New England summer.

Packing winds of 75 mph (120 kph), the storm swirled up the Eastern Seaboard after sideswiping North Carolina's Outer Banks, where it caused flooding but no injuries and little damage. The storm was swinging of New York City, Long Island and the rest of the mid-Atlantic region, but was expected to bring rain and high winds as it passes just off Cape Cod, Nantucket Island and Martha's Vineyard late Friday night.

Vacationers pulled their boats from the water and canceled Labor Day weekend reservations on Nantucket, the well-to-do resort island and old-time whaling port expected to get the worst of the storm. Shopkeepers boarded up their windows. Swimmers in New England were warned to stay out of the water — or off the beach altogether — because of the danger of getting swept away by high waves.

Airlines canceled dozens of flights into New England, and Amtrak suspended train service between New York and Boston.

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