Norwegians call for tougher laws after mass killing

By REUTERS
August 1, 2011 13:53

 
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OSLO - Norwegians believe penalties for serious crimes in their country should be tightened in the wake of a shooting and bomb attack that killed 77 people in July, an opinion poll showed on Monday.

In a survey of 1,283 people conducted six days after the July 22 attack, 65.5 percent said the penalties were "too low" and only 23.8 percent believed they were suitable, newspaper Verdens Gang reported.

Anders Behring Breivik, the 32-year old anti-Islamic immigration zealot who has confessed to the bombing in Oslo and shooting spree on a nearby island, has been charged by police with terrorism, which carries a sentence of up to 21 years.

He also faces the risk of successive five-year protective custody sentences, and some have also called for the use of provisions on crimes against humanity that could give an initial sentence of up to 30 years.

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