Pakistani teen survivor of Taliban shooting speaks of Nobel hopes

By REUTERS
October 11, 2013 06:53
1 minute read.

NEW YORK - Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot in the head by the Taliban for campaigning for girl's education, spoke on Thursday of the possibility of winning this year's Nobel Peace Prize and said she might like to be Pakistan's prime minister one day.

"If I get the Nobel Peace Prize, I think it will be such a great honor, and more than I deserve, and such a great responsibility as well," she told an audience at a New York City cultural center on Thursday night.A win would "help me to begin this campaign for girls' education, but the real goal, the most precious goal that I want to get and for which I am thirsty and I want to struggle hard for, that is the award of seeing every child to go to school," she added.

Yousafzai, 16, a favorite among experts and betting agencies to be named the winner of the prestigious prize, which is to be announced on Friday, was in conversation with journalist Christiane Amanpour, at the 92nd Street Y, a cultural center in Manhattan.

After receiving death threats from the Taliban for defying the Islamist militant group with her outspoken views on the right to education, Yousafzai was shot a year ago while on a school bus near her village in Swat in northwestern Pakistan.


Related Content

Breaking news
August 19, 2019
Canada slams UK decision to "off-load" Islamist fighter

By REUTERS

Cookie Settings