Poll: One-third of US voters may still switch candidates

By ASSOCIATED PRESS
October 25, 2010 11:38
1 minute read.

 
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WASHINGTON — One in three people has yet to lock onto a choice in the November 2 congressional elections, according to an Associated Press-GfK Poll. Yet in this year of the fed-up voter, even these folks offer little hope to Democrats.

Despite record political spending and months of frenzied campaigning, one-third of likely voters remain steadfastly undecided or favor a candidate but say they could change their mind, according to the survey. Such a large group might seem like a mother lode of opportunity for Democrats scuffling to unearth enough votes to prevent a Republican takeover of Congress.

Yet a close look reveals that these people aren't especially friendly to the party that seems all but certain to lose House and Senate seats on Nov. 2.

Forty-five percent of persuadable voters tentatively prefer their district's GOP House candidate while 38 percent pick the Democratic contender — the same 7 percentage point margin Republicans hold with people who have already decided. Compared with voters who have decided on a candidate, those open to change think less of congressional Democrats, are more inclined to oust their incumbent representative and are more pessimistic about the economy, this year's bellwether issue.

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