Spain's politicians pledge to stop evictions after suicide

By REUTERS
November 10, 2012 20:43

 
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MADRID - Spain's conservative prime minister and the leader of the opposition aim to agree measures on Monday to stop banks evicting homeowners after a woman's suicide before her property was repossessed caused public outrage.

"No one should be without a home for not being able to pay," Alfredo Perez Rubalcaba, leader of the opposition Socialist Party said on Saturday.

Northern Spanish mortgage lender Kutxabank said it was suspending repossessions after 53-year-old former Socialist councilor Amaia Egana threw herself out of her fourth-story apartment window in Barakaldo in the Basque Country as court officials came up the stairs to evict her on Friday.

Egana's death, the second eviction-related suicide in Spain in recent weeks, added urgency to an agreement reached on Wednesday between the ruling conservative People's Party and the Socialists to seek a bipartisan deal over repossessions.

Graffiti accusing bankers of murder and calling for an end to evictions appeared on some bank branches in the Basque Country on Saturday, Spanish media reported.

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