Business Scene

The business community turned out in force for Osem's changing of the guard that took place at the David Intercontinental Hotel, where CEO Dan Propper passed on the baton to Gazi Kaplan.

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September 5, 2006 09:34
4 minute read.
dan propper 88 298

dan propper 88 298. (photo credit: Courtesy)

 
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The business community turned out in force for Osem's changing of the guard that took place at the David Intercontinental Hotel, where CEO Dan Propper passed on the baton to Gazi Kaplan. That doesn't mean that Propper is going out to pasture. He's still going to find business and philanthropic interests to take up his time. The reason that he's not going to just sit back and take it easy, he explained, is because when discussing with his wife, Susie, the prospect of stepping down, her reaction was: "I married you for better for worse - but not for lunch." AFTER SEVEN years as director of the New Jerusalem Foundation and 11 years working for the betterment of Jerusalem, Zvi Raviv has decided that the the time has come to move into the private sector. Raviv, who has spent 36 years in institutional and organizational positions, will act as a consultant and advisor to philanthropists who not only want to give to Israel, but who want to invest in Israel. With the knowledge that he has gathered through his wide range of acquaintances in politics, business and society, Raviv believes that he is in the position to give would-be investors sound advice. The New Jerusalem Foundation was created by Ehud Olmert during his period as mayor of the city. Olmert thought mistakenly that not only would he take over Teddy Kollek's mayoral mantle, but also that of chairman of the Jerusalem Foundation, the organization founded by Kollek through which generous people from around the world support educational, cultural, social welfare and beautification projects throughout the capital. When Olmert learned that he could not foist himself on the Jerusalem Foundation, he promptly established a similarly named competitor organization and put Raviv in charge. During Raviv's tenure as director, The New Jerusalem Foundation built schools, sports facilities, a dance center and music conservatories, and provided much needed help to young people at risk and the elderly. The NJF created a social club for new olim, providing a means for musical and theatrical expression for immigrants from Russia, Ethiopia, Italy and Spanish-speaking countries. IT'S POSSIBLE that Raviv's departure may well herald the NJF's demise. Deputy Mayor Yigal Amedi, who holds the city's cultural portfolio, is eager to set up a cultural foundation to be headed by billionaire philanthropist Arkady Gaydamak, who already supports numerous causes in Jerusalem. Amedi is convinced that with a man of Gaydamak's exemplary philanthropy at the helm, other affluent people will follow - and the city will blossom. As it is, The Jerusalem Foundation and the New Jerusalem Foundation are competing for the same donors for similar projects. The introduction of a cultural foundation will reduce everyone's size of the pie, so it's on the cards that one of the existing foundations will have to go - and it's not likely to be The Jerusalem Foundation. JERUSALEM'S MASTER baker Danny Angel is to receive a life achievement award from the Jerusalem branch of the Israel Manufacturers Association, in which he has played a major role for decades. Among those who have indicated they will attend the event are Interior Minister Roni Bar-On and Shraga Brosch, the president of the Israel Manufacturers Association. WHILE JOB security in many places of employment has become dicey and slave labor is increasingly becoming the norm, Ness Technologies Israel is aware of the fact that the workers make the company. Acknowledging that, Ness has created a new position - senior vice president for organization resources. The first person to fill that position will be Eli Achi Mordechai, 54, who will be responsible for all the services that Ness provides for its employees. He will also be in charge of human resources and wage logistics. By giving its workers more support and adding to the quality of their work environment Ness Technologies is expressing its recognition of its obligations to its employees. It's a trailblazing concept for Israel that hopefully will become a general trend - but no one should hold their breath. Achi Mordechai previously managed the public sector group at Ness Technologies and before that was CEO of Malam Systems. THE NEW senior vice president of the Postal Bank at the Communications Ministry is Oren Levian. An accountant by training, Levian won an interministerial tender published by the Civil Service Commission. Levian, 35, was previously employed in a series of senior positions at the Taxation Authority. A Ben-Gurion University alumnus who majored in economics and accounting, he is now completing a law degree at Tel Aviv University. THE SECURITIES Authority has appointed Dr. Shlomit Zata as its chief economist. Zata has been teaching at Tel Aviv University's School for Business Administration since 2001. While developing her academic career, she has been a major player in the business world, acting as a consultant to IBM in the US and serving as a director of Omega New Partners. She was also a member of Tel Aviv University's investments and pension fund committees. Until recently she served as a director of Bank Igud, and also served on various committees of the former Makefet Pension Fund.

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