Fischer: Problematic norms influence decision-making

The problematic norm to say "I promised, but I didn't promise to implement," is what influences the process of agreements in this country, said Governor of the Bank of Israel, Stanley Fischer, at the Caesarea Forum on Wednesday.

By SHARON WROBEL
June 28, 2007 07:03
1 minute read.
stanley fischer biz 88 298

stanley fischer biz 88 2. (photo credit: Ariel Jerozolimski)

 
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The problematic norm to say "I promised, but I didn't promise to implement," is what influences the process of agreements in this country, said Governor of the Bank of Israel, Stanley Fischer, at the Caesarea Forum on Wednesday. "The Israeli approach of "I promised but I didn't promise to implement" might sound funny, but these norms are influencing the way decisions are made, agreements are reached, deals are done and Israel is run," he added, while speaking as part of the panel "Legal and Ethical Aspects of Israel's Integration into the Global Economy and OECD Nations." Dr. Daniel Kaufman, Senior Director and Consultant on corruption prevention and governance at the World Bank, warned that due to the approach that Fischer spoke about, Israel has been underperforming in many dimensions of governance and in need of great improvement in order to secure sustained future growth and resilience. "In the control of corruption, Israel nowadays rates among the top 50 countries among more than 200 worldwide. Yet Israel is far from rating among the top 25, and furthermore its performance on controlling corruption has deteriorated since the 1990s," said Kaufman. "Furthermore," he said, "Israel can be said to face a "governance deficit," particularly if benchmarked against industrialized countries (OECD). Israel rates among the bottom five countries of the richer industrialized world in any dimension of governance". Kaufman added that if Israel wanted to sustain growth in the future, the country needed to make it its goal over the next decade to join the tier of the top 20-25 countries in the world in terms of governance. "There is enormous potential for improvement by a country like Israel if it implements transparency reforms, such as full public disclosure of the assets of high officials, politicians and judges; full disclosure of campaign contributions and placing public procurement in a transparent manner on the web to avoid cases of protekzia," said Kaufman.

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