Iscar: Is it open for business or closed for its safety?

An unidentified Iscar employee manning the central office earlier in the day told the Post that "the factory is closed. No one is here ... because of the situation."

By DANIEL KENNEMER
July 19, 2006 07:45
1 minute read.
iscar logo 88

iscar logo 88. (photo credit: )

As evening fell Tuesday, it was still unclear whether Iscar's facility at Tefen in Northern Israel was functioning or not. Iscar CEO Jacob Harpaz told The Jerusalem Post that only the Kiryat Shmona facility was "totally closed" and that "for the most part, everyone is working." "In the important places work continues as usual," he said. Specifically, divisions located in Tefen that are central to the company's international operations - including logistics, storage and product management - were "all working." Production was partially halted, since the plant decided to move up a previously planned yearly vacation, he noted. Since some divisions had already left on vacation several days before, Harpaz said he was unable to estimate what percentage of the workers who were expected to come to work were absent. The factory had been declared to be a vital service several years ago, allowing it to remain open during the crisis, he added. "Some things are necessary," he said. Iscar Chairman Eitan Wertheimer, however, told the Bloomberg wire service that the company had lost about two and a half days of work and may lose another two. Speaking from London, Wertheimer said employees would make up for lost time by working nights and weekends, and indicated that there would be no delay in deliveries. Meanwhile, an unidentified Iscar employee manning the central office earlier in the day told the Post that "the factory is closed. No one is here ... because of the situation."


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