Jerusalemites log country's longest work day

Of those surveyed, 70% claimed to be satisfied with their work and were not interested in changing and 28% said they intended to leave their job and seek employment elsewhere. The remainder were undecided.

By SETH FREEDMAN
May 2, 2006 07:59
1 minute read.
time clock 88

time clock 88. (photo credit: )

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Jerusalemites work the longest hours in the country, logging 8.7 hours a day compared with Israel's average eight-hour work day, according to a study released Monday. In Southern Israel workers do around 7.5 hours of work per day, while in the Sharon region the average is 8.3 hours and in Haifa and the north of the country the figure is 8.6 hours. Broken down by age, which was carried out by the HPS unit of Kav Manhe, which provides information on taxation and labor law, indicated that workers between the ages of 45-54 worked the longest hours - an average of nine hours per day - compared with under seven hours for 18-24 year olds. Women, meanwhile worked fewer hours than men, clocking 7.7 hours daily vs. 8.7 for men. Furthermore, the study showed that 3% of people work from home. Of those who travel to their place of work, 45% drive in their own vehicles; 10% travel in a company car; 21.4% go by public transportation; and 15% walk to work. Of those surveyed, 70% claimed to be satisfied with their work and were not interested in changing their jobs this year and 28% said they intended to leave their job and seek employment elsewhere. The remainder were undecided. The report also delved into salaries, finding that one-third of workers are paid on the first of the month, another third receive their money on the 10th, with the 5th and the 9th also being popular pay dates. The study surveyed 500 members of the country's Jewish population, aged 18 and over.

Related Content

The Teva Pharmaceutical Industries
April 30, 2015
Teva doubles down on Mylan, despite rejection

By GLOBES, NIV ELIS