The value of election promises

According to the report, Huldai and his personal advisers produced a draft document of their plans for the city just before he became mayor in November, 1998.

By MIRIAM BULWAR DAVID-HAY
November 18, 2007 07:51
1 minute read.

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Mayor Ron Huldai will have been at Tel Aviv's helm for exactly 10 years when municipal elections take place next year, and Yediot Tel Aviv has dug up his campaign promises from 1998 to see how many of them he has fulfilled. The newspaper found that out of six "flagship projects" Huldai planned, just one has actually been carried out. According to the report, Huldai and his personal advisers produced a draft document of their plans for the city just before he became mayor in November, 1998. His six "flagship" plans were: a mass transit project to alleviate traffic and parking problems; a complete renovation of Kikar Rabin including an underground parking lot; an extensive renewal project for streets in central Tel Aviv; redevelopment of the beach and promenade; construction of small and medium-sized hotels to draw in more tourists; and the closing of the Glilot fuel site. The report said that nine years later, while a beginning has been made on several of the projects, only the last one has actually been carried out. A municipal spokesman responded that Huldai's "vision" of turning Tel Aviv-Jaffa from a neglected city into a blossoming one has been realized, and the quality of life for residents has "improved in all areas - education, culture, cleanliness, green areas and environmental quality."

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Netanyahu walks with Harper
September 10, 2012
test with pnina

By JPOST.COM STAFF