Israeli firm’s cameras recording Japanese nuclear core

Security cameras installed by Israeli defense company at Fukushima plant have ability to detect presence of radioactive clouds in air.

By
March 15, 2011 01:43
1 minute read.
Smoke rises from Fukushima Daiichi 1 nuke reactor

Japan nuclear explosion 311. (photo credit: REUTERS/NTV via Reuters TV)

 
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As the world continues to gaze with concern at Japan’s Fukushima nuclear power plant, hi-tech security cameras installed by an Israeli defense firm are recording events at the troubled core from an insider’s vantage point.

The Arava-based Magna BSP company, which specializes in producing and installing stereoscopic sensory and thermal imaging cameras, had been contracted to place cameras around one of the plant’s six cores – the core that has been experiencing explosions and overheating.

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Speaking to The Jerusalem Post on Monday, Magna’s head, Haim Siboni, said the thermal cameras also had the ability to detect the presence of radioactive clouds in the air, but added that Magna had not been able to gain access to the images recorded by the cameras at this time.

“Because we are using these special cameras, we can also identify radioactive clouds, due to the spectrum that our cameras can sense,” Siboni said.

Although Magna is able to gain remote access to its computer system, which receives the cameras’ images, Siboni said his company had not yet been authorized to do so.


“We have not been allowed to take control remotely yet,” Siboni said.

Magna has been asked to secure a second core at the Fukushima plant in the near future.

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