Comptroller concerned over safety of eggs produced in Israel

Samples of eggs taken from a small number of poultry farms between late 2012 and early 2013 indicate traces of toxic dioxins.

By
May 14, 2014 20:20
1 minute read.
Eggs at Machane Yehuda market

Eggs at market 370. (photo credit: Marc Israel Sellem/The Jerusalem Post)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Many deficiencies exist in monitoring food products from animal origins, causing potential danger to public health, State Comptroller Joseph Shapira wrote in a section of his report released on Wednesday

Samples of eggs taken from a small number of poultry farms between late 2012 and early 2013 indicated traces of toxic dioxins, at higher levels than allowable, which could be dangerous to the health particularly of infants and children, the state comptroller said. 

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


The State Comptroller's Office also evaluated several aspects related to the meat industry from January to July 2013, examining issues such as the veterinary supervision of animals, activities of slaughterhouses and animal welfare.

Slaughterhouses that market their products only to domestic consumers operate with much lower standards than do those that market abroad, the report said. Meanwhile, no government agency examines whether municipal veterinarians are performing supervision over food as required, the state comptroller added.

"Due to the deficiencies identified in the stages of supervision of animal-based food products, there is room for concern that the food is not fitting for human consumption," Shapira wrote.

The state comptroller called upon the agriculture, health and interior ministries to ensure that local authorities are monitoring animal-based food production as required. In addition, he stressed that government ministries must expedite the determination of binding guidelines on the subject of animal welfare, under the Animal Welfare Law, for handling animals in general.




Related Content

Holland Park’s forest, north of Eilat.
August 11, 2014
Promising trend of prosecution for environmental crimes, officials say

By SHARON UDASIN