Tune in to radio signals to measure climate change

Tel Aviv University researcher says cost-effective radio wave measurement can be a valuable contribution to the ongoing effort to track climate change.

By VIVA SARAH PRESS/ISRAEL21C
August 25, 2013 18:15
A satellite dish.

Satellite dish 370. (photo credit: REUTERS)

 
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Radio waves reflecting back to Earth from the ionosphere, one of the regions of the upper atmosphere, can offer valuable news on climate change, according to new research from Tel Aviv University.

It is already known that the ionosphere plays an important role in global communications. Ionized by solar radiation, this electricity-rich region is used for the transmission of long wave communications, such as radio waves.

Now Prof. Colin Price of Tel Aviv University’s Department of Geophysical, Atmospheric and Planetary Sciences, working alongside PhD candidate Israel Silber, says that the strength of radio signals on the ground is a reliable indicator of temperature change above.


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