Time, gentlemen, time

Last month, what has come to be known as the Bar Law passed a preliminary reading in the Knesset plenum by a vote of 37 in favor, three abstentions and one against.

By DANIEL BEN-TAL
November 22, 2006 09:38
1 minute read.
Time, gentlemen, time

gavel 88.298. (photo credit: )

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

Last month, what has come to be known as the Bar Law passed a preliminary reading in the Knesset plenum by a vote of 37 in favor, three abstentions and one against. If it passes into law, the new statute will prohibit the sale of alcohol at bars and restaurants (and perhaps even supermarkets) between 2 a.m. and 6 a.m. At present, bars in Israel are not required by law to close at a certain hour. The proposal, presented by Kadima MK Ruhama Avraham, is intended to fight "the scourge of violence and the slaughter on the roads," but its effectiveness is a matter of conjecture. Avraham points to statistics from other countries, where she says similar laws have produced a 50% decrease in violence and a 20% decrease in alcohol-related accidents. Pub owners retort that the abuse of alcohol - rather than alcohol itself - is the source of drinking problems that lead to violence and traffic accidents, adding that a standard closing time would produce more under-the-influence drivers on the roads at the same time. In 2005, the traditional compulsory closing time of 11 p.m. (or 10:30 p.m. in some districts) was scrapped by some 90,000 pubs in England and Wales. According to press reports, police officials have noticed since licensing hours were extended, major city centers have been quieter on Friday nights.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Supreme Court President Asher Grunis
August 28, 2014
Grapevine: September significance

By GREER FAY CASHMAN