KKL-JNF approves constructed wetland new research project fo

KKL-JNF recently approved an experimental research project for enriching underground water in Israel. The experiment involves purifying urban runoff water using biofilter technology developed by an Israeli

By KKL
January 11, 2010 14:50
1 minute read.

 
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KKL-JNF recently approved an experimental research project for enriching underground water in Israel. The experiment involves purifying urban runoff water using biofilter technology developed by an Israeli, Yaron Zinger, with a team of researchers from the faculty of civil engineering at Monash University, Australia.



"The water shortage in Israel is growing more severe. Owing to the worsening drought last year - the driest year of the past decade - it is essential to provide solutions involving alternative sources of water. The biofilter technology provides this type of solution. The pilot experiment will help us overcome the water crisis," explained Efi Stenzler, KKL-JNF World Chairman.



Tens of millions of cubic meters of rain water are lost every year in Israel. In addition, the runoff water carries poisonous materials that penetrate and reach the ground water, causing pollution and changes in the ecological balance. The biofilter technology that will be applied in this project will enrich the Israeli water economy.



The Biofilter technology is an organic biological technology that is environmentally friendly. In the "constructed wetland" technique runoff water undergoes a purification process using filters that consist of gravel mixed with plants upon which bacteria develop, that filter the water and remove metals and pollutants.



The entire project is being funded by contributions from friends of KKL-JNF Australia, who understand that the issue of improving the water economy in Israel is of prime importance. The biofilter project is supported from the scientific aspect by Monash University in Victoria, and has been successfully applied by the water company in Melbourne who approved its application in various localities. In Israel a city will be selected to be the forerunner where the project will be applied first.



For more information, please visit our website at www.kkl.org.il/eng or e-mail ahuvab@kkl.org.il





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