The Future of the Globe after Cop15

The world's largest ever political gathering, COP15, the Copenhagen climate change conference, began with a bang and ended with a whimper. Although it coincided with the festival of Hanuka, a festival of miracles, the conference produced none of the comparable miracles for which many wished.

By KKL
February 22, 2010 11:18
2 minute read.
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World_Top. (photo credit: KKL)

 
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By Dr. Orr Karassin - Head of the KKL-JNF delegation to the U.N climate change conference



The world's largest ever political gathering, COP15, the Copenhagen climate change conference, began with a bang and ended with a whimper. Although it coincided with the festival of Hanuka, a festival of miracles, the conference produced none of the comparable miracles for which many wished. No notable achievement resulted from the gathering of 130 heads of state and 193 national delegations, all stressing the decisive moment, the gravity of the issues and the great common challenge facing mankind. Only a minute group of developed countries were willing to commit to substantial, clear and verifiable GHG emission reduction targets that could actually bring us to the 2º warming target that had been agreed to be the upper limit before dangerous results occurred from climate change. Several countries, particularly the most vulnerable small Island states, claimed that even this limit is too high as it probably represents their complete annihilation. Disagreement reigned until the end of the conference on issues ranging from emission reductions by large developing economies; the quantity of aid and funds for adaptation to, and mitigation of the damage of, global warming in developing countries; and especially, the development and mechanism of transferring technologies.



During the last days, even in the presence of President Obama, it became evident that the world has not mustered the motivation to effectively tackle the greatest challenge humankind has ever known. It is daunting that we may never witness international leadership or global commitments essential to stop dangerous global warming. We may have nothing left but to demand from our leaders, adaptation to the warming - preparing counties for the worst.



Adaptation will, in fact, be required from all nations even in an optimistic 2º warming scenario. Some have estimated that at least 1 trillion USD will be needed to prepare countries for climate changes before 2020. KKL-JNF work in Israel's arid and semi-arid environment has gained it significant knowledge on adaptation, such as afforestation in arid and semi-arid environments, water harvesting, soil conservation and preventing degradation. The KKL-JNF delegation to Copenhagen vowed to join the international pledge for technology transfer and came with the intent of sharing KKL-JNF information with those in need. Dr. Orr Karassin noted that "not many developing countries share our circumstances of such an arid environment so Israeli knowledge on combating desertification has become unique and highly respected throughout the world. We aim to share our knowledge as part of the global effort to mitigate damage and adapt to climate change. In cooperation with the State of Israel KKL-JNF aims to initiate a five-year plan for capacity building, counseling and providing support for adaptation programs in developing counties."



For more information, please visit our website at www.kkl.org.il/eng or e-mail ahuvab@kkl.org.il



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