Anglo olim ride for cure to fatal disease

80 English-speaking immigrants will bike 75 kilometers in the North on Thursday to raise money for research into Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD).

By
October 24, 2007 03:27
1 minute read.
biking 88 298

biking 88 298. (photo credit: )

Eighty English-speaking immigrants will take a day off work to cycle 75 kilometers in the North on Thursday to raise money for research into the incurable degenerative disease Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). Sponsors have pledged some NIS 350,000 so far. The donations will go to the Gavriel Meir Trust, which is run by Ra'anana residents who established the fund when the son of close friends in London, five-year-old Gavriel Rosenfeld, was diagnosed with the muscle-wasting disease. Each of the bikers has to guarantee a minimum of NIS 6,000 in donations in order to ride. DMD is the most common sex-linked fatal genetic disorder to affect children around the world, with about one in every 3,500 boys born with it. Children with DMD cannot produce dystrophin, a protein necessary for muscle strength and function. As a result, every skeletal muscle in the body deteriorates. So far, Gavriel is an active, athletic child who loves life, according to volunteer Tanya Stern. But unless a cure is found, he is doomed, as DMD kills its victims by their late teens or early 20s, and most are confined to a wheelchair between the ages of 10 and 12. DMD is also associated with respiratory failure, heart failure and debilitating orthopedic complications. The funds raised will go toward supporting critical research projects around the world. Would-be donors and bikers can contact info@thegmtrust.org or call 054-309-0328. The various research projects being funded by the trust are not only for the less common strain (which Gavriel has), but also covers projects that will hopefully lead to a cure for all boys who have this condition.


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