Brazilian and Argentine scientists uncover huge plant-eating dinosaur

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October 15, 2007 21:20

 
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The skeleton of what's believed to be a new dinosaur species - a 32 meter plant-eater that is among the largest dinosaurs ever found - has been uncovered in Argentina, scientists said Monday. Scientists from Argentina and Brazil said the Patagonian dinosaur appears to represent a previously unknown species of Titanosaur because of the unique structure of its neck. They named it Futalognkosaurus dukei after the Mapuche Indian words for "giant" and "chief," and for Duke Energy Argentina, which helped fund the skeleton's excavation. "This is one of the biggest in the world and one of the most complete of these giants that exist," said Jorge Calvo, director of paleontology center of National University of Comahue, Argentina, lead author of a study on the dinosaur published in the peer-reviewed Annals of the Brazilian Academy of Sciences. Scientists said the giant herbivore walked the Earth some 88 million years ago, during the late Cretaceous period.

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