Scientists determine ice mummy's cause of death

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June 6, 2007 18:51

 
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More than 5,000 years after the prehistoric hunter known as Oetzi drew his last breath on a snow-covered Alpine mountain, scientists said Wednesday they have determined how he died. Researchers from Switzerland and Italy used newly developed medical scanners to examine the frozen corpse to reveal that the man bled to death after being struck in the back by an arrow, according to an article published online in the Journal of Archeological Science. The arrow tore a hole in an artery beneath his left collarbone, leading to massive loss of blood and shock and causing Oetzi to suffer a heart attack. Even today, the chances of surviving such an injury long enough to receive hospital treatment are only 40 percent, according to the article.

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