New technology may single out cancerous prostate cells

Researchers develop breakthrough technology that discriminates cancerous prostate cells found in bodily fluids from healthy ones.

By JPOST.COM STAFF
October 1, 2011 01:10
1 minute read.
COMPATIBLE HUMAN stem cells can cure blood cancers

Stem Cells 311. (photo credit: (University of Louisville Medical School)

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later Don't show it again

Scientists may be able to discriminate cancerous prostate cells found in bodily fluids from healthy ones, researchers at UC Santa Barbara have discovered.

The breakthrough technology will be useful in in developing a microdevice that will help in understanding when prostate cancer will metastasize, or spread to other parts of the body, researchers said.

Be the first to know - Join our Facebook page.


"There have been studies to find the relationship between the number of cancer cells in the blood, and the outcome of the disease," said first author Alessia Pallaoro, postdoctoral fellow in UCSB's Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. "The higher the number of cancer cells there are in the patient's blood, the worse the prognosis."

Although the primary tumor does not kill prostate cancer patients, the researchers explained, metastasis does. "The delay is not well understood," said Gary Braun, second author and postdoctoral fellow in the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology. "There is a big focus on understanding what causes the tumor to shed cells into the blood. If you could catch them all, then you could stop metastasis. The first thing is to monitor their appearance."

Using a type of laser spectroscopy called surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy, the team of researchers were able to develop a way of discriminating between cancerous and non-cancerous cells.

The new technique could be expanded by adding more colors as more biomarkers are found, Pallaoro said.

Related Content

Lab
August 31, 2014
Weizmann scientists bring nature back to artificially selected lab mice

By JUDY SIEGEL-ITZKOVICH