ACLU sues to remove Ten Commandments from court

By
February 7, 2007 22:02

 
X

Dear Reader,
As you can imagine, more people are reading The Jerusalem Post than ever before. Nevertheless, traditional business models are no longer sustainable and high-quality publications, like ours, are being forced to look for new ways to keep going. Unlike many other news organizations, we have not put up a paywall. We want to keep our journalism open and accessible and be able to keep providing you with news and analyses from the frontlines of Israel, the Middle East and the Jewish World.

As one of our loyal readers, we ask you to be our partner.

For $5 a month you will receive access to the following:

  • A user experience almost completely free of ads
  • Access to our Premium Section
  • Content from the award-winning Jerusalem Report and our monthly magazine to learn Hebrew - Ivrit
  • A brand new ePaper featuring the daily newspaper as it appears in print in Israel

Help us grow and continue telling Israel’s story to the world.

Thank you,

Ronit Hasin-Hochman, CEO, Jerusalem Post Group
Yaakov Katz, Editor-in-Chief

UPGRADE YOUR JPOST EXPERIENCE FOR 5$ PER MONTH Show me later

The American Civil Liberties Union is suing to force a conservative Christian county in Florida to remove a hulking Ten Commandments monument from the courthouse steps. The 5-foot-tall (1.50-meter-tall), 6-ton black granite monument stands in front of a building for the courthouse, the elections supervisor office, the tax collector and other public offices in Dixie County. The lawsuit filed in federal court Tuesday said the monument heaps on its religious message with the inscription "Love God and Keep His Commandments" in large capital letters at its base. The lawsuit says the monument violates two amendments to the US constitution because it is not part of a historical display and because the uniquely Christian message of the Ten Commandments on a government building could intimidate people with different religious beliefs. The US Supreme Court has ruled that religious displays are not inherently unconstitutional and must be considered on a case-by-case basis. Last year, the high court allowed the Ten Commandments to be displayed outside the Texas state Capitol but not inside two Kentucky courthouses, where the justices said the displays promoted a religious message.

Join Jerusalem Post Premium Plus now for just $5 and upgrade your experience with an ads-free website and exclusive content. Click here>>

Related Content

Cal Fire firefighters comb through a house destroyed by the Camp Fire in Paradise
November 15, 2018
Eight more victims of California wildfire found, raising death toll to 56

By REUTERS