British government passes anti-terror law

British Prime Minister Tony Blair's government won a crucial parliamentary vote on sweeping new anti-terrorism legislation Wednesday, but faces a furt

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October 26, 2005 22:03
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British Prime Minister Tony Blair's government won a crucial parliamentary vote on sweeping new anti-terrorism legislation Wednesday, but faces a further fight over plans to lock up terror suspects for 90 days without charge. Following a lengthy debate in the House of Commons, lawmakers voted 472-94 to back the Terror Bill. The main opposition Conservative Party supported the bill, but warned it would seek to block the legislation at a later stage if the government did not rethink some of the proposals. In the wake of the July attacks on London's transit system, the government said it wanted to extend the maximum 14-day detention for terror suspects without charge to three months, outlaw attending terrorist training camps and make it an offense to glorify or encourage terrorism. The bill also aims to outlaw preparing an act of terrorism, publishing or selling material that incites terrorism and giving or receiving training in terrorist techniques - such as how to spread viruses, place bombs and cause a stampede in a crowd.

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