British woman with two wombs has three girls

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December 22, 2006 18:27

 
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A woman with two wombs has given birth to three children in what is believed to the first case of its kind, a hospital official said Friday. Hannah Kersey, 23, gave birth to three girls in September, said Richard Dottle, a spokesman for Southmead Hospital in Bristol where the triplets were born. The children spent nine weeks in the hospital but the reason was not disclosed. The girls, two identical twins delivered from one womb and a single baby from the other, were born seven weeks early by Caesarean, the British Broadcasting Corp. reported. "There haven't been any similar accounts where three healthy babies are born of two wombs," said Yakoub Khalaf, a consulting gynecologist at Guy's and St. Thomas's Hospital. He said that multiple pregnancies tended to be risky, and that delivering triplets under such abnormal circumstances was even riskier. Separate or partially joined wombs are uncommon, although not rare. About one woman in 1,000 has them, according to Khalaf.

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