Kurds seek damages from Saddam in San Diego court

Two Kurds living in the United States have sued Saddam Hussein in US federal court, asking compensation for Kurds who were subjected to genocidal atta

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October 19, 2005 04:10
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Two Kurds living in the United States have sued Saddam Hussein in US federal court, asking compensation for Kurds who were subjected to genocidal attacks in Iraq in the 1980s. Hassen Ali Abdullah and Khalida Ali asked the court to award them and their children unspecified monetary damages from the deposed Iraqi dictator and one of his senior generals known as "Chemical Ali," Ali Hassan al-Majid, who also is named as a defendant. The plaintiffs were identified in the lawsuit as San Diego County residents who lived in Iraq in the late 1980s. They asked the court to declare the suit, filed last week in San Diego, a class-action on behalf of all Kurds who lived in northern Iraq from 1987 to 1989 and any children born to them since 1987. The federal Alien Tort Claims Act allows citizens of foreign countries to file lawsuits in US courts for wrongs "committed in violation of the law of nations."

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