Moderate earthquake shakes southeastern Turkey

A moderate earthquake shook southeastern Turkey on Tuesday, causing cracks at some buildings in a village, authorities said. There were no injuries.

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October 18, 2005 17:55
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A moderate earthquake shook southeastern Turkey on Tuesday, causing cracks at some buildings in a village, authorities said. There were no injuries. The quake, with a preliminary magnitude of 4.2, was centered on the village of Hidirbaba in the province of Elazig, the Istanbul-based Kandilli Observatory said. The temblor caused some cracks and slightly damaged at least four buildings in the village, the Anatolia news agency quoted village official Osman Karabulut as saying. The quake hit just a day after two strong undersea earthquakes shook the port city of Izmir in western Turkey, injuring some 30 people who jumped from windows or balconies in panic. Some residents spent the night outside, too afraid to go back into their homes, media reports said. Quakes are frequent in Turkey, which lies on the active North Anatolian fault. Ruptures in the fault caused two quakes in August and November 1999 that killed some 18,000 people and devastated parts of northwestern Turkey.



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